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Showing posts from September, 2016

S.F. has the most overvalued housing market in the country

While stopping just short of calling San Francisco’s market a bubble, new analysis from UBS argues that the city has the most overvalued housing market in the United States. According to the UBS Global Real Estate Bubble Index, housing in S.F. is more overvalued than in international hotspots like Amsterdam, Zurich or Paris.  Read more.

ExxonMobil sued for decades-long cover up of climate change

Oil giant ExxonMobil is being sued for allegedly polluting a Massachusetts river and violating federal water laws. The suit also charges the company with knowing of climate change’s adverse affect, but hiding it.
Last year it was revealed the company started to conceal its own findings as early as 1977 that fossil fuels cause global warming.  Read more.

Wells Fargo Doubles Down on Predatory Banking: Illegally Repossesses Cars of Military Members

On September 9, I wrote about how the banking giant Wells Fargo went on an illegal spree of opening false credit cards, checking and saving accounts; charged customers fees for unrequested "services"; and then fired more than 5,000 employees when the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau (CFPB) discovered the illicit activity. The CFPB -- conceived by Elizabeth Warren -- has limited power to address systemic banking abuse, but it did force Wells Fargo to stop these practices and pay an extremely modest fine of less than $200 million.  Read more.

The Other Housing Crisis: Finding a Home in Rural America

For Debbie Green, purchasing a home was a dream come true. The 56-year-old resident of rural Elkins, West Virginia, suffers from five types of debilitating epileptic seizures, and had been renting a friend's mobile home at a discounted rate. Unable to work, she got by on monthly disability payments of about $900, but was still struggling to pay her utility bills. Sometimes, at the end of the month, she had only $4 in the bank and wondered if she would need to cut off the electricity or water.  Read more.

Ecuador Proposes Worldwide Elimination of Tax Havens

Two Hundred Farms in China Breed Tigers for Slaughter for Body Parts, Luxury Goods

In legal tiger farms across China, some 6,000 caged cats are kept in filthy conditions and will be killed for dubious medicinal uses and as home decor for the country's newly-rich elite. The sordid business is mostly legal, but hides behind carefully-worded agreements and pretensions of conservation. The issue is expected to be addressed at this week's Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species (CITES) meeting in Johannesburg.  Read more.

First Nations Chief Rejects 'Charade' UK-Canada Reconciliation Ceremony

A top British Columbia First Nations chief has rejected an invitation to a "reconciliation ceremony" with the U.K. royals during their visit to Canada, saying he would not participate in the "public charade" that whitewashes the government's policy failures on Indigenous issues.
"Reconciliation has to be more than empty symbolic gestures," Grand Chief Stewart Phillip of the Union of British Columbia Indian Chiefs (UBCIC) said on Monday.  Read more.

Oh, Say Can You See … The Point of View of This American Male of African Ancestry

It seems like Colin Kaepernick’s choice around how to exert his freedom of speech isn’t meeting a lot of people’s need for a certain type of respect shown in a certain type of way. I’m guessing from that angle this whole choosing to silently, and nonviolently, protest the diminished humanity of some of his fellow citizens (by sitting/kneeling down during the playing of the national anthem at a professional football game) is extremely irritating and frustrating for a lot of people?  Read more.

Authorities seeking motive in Washington state mall shooting that killed five

Authorities said Sunday they did not yet know why a 20-year-old man in Burlington, Wash. shot five people dead with a rifle at a Macy’s makeup counter over the weekend. The suspect, Arcan Cetin, was described by high school friends and neighbors as a troubled person who made vulgar comments toward women.
Cetin is expected to face first-degree murder charges when he appears Monday in Skagit County District Court, about 60 miles north of Seattle.  Read more.

1 shot dead, 5 wounded on Illinois University campus, shooter at large

One person was killed and five others injured on Sunday morning in two shootings near the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign, which the police believe to be related.
The first shooting occurred 12:30 a.m. after an argument at a house party spilled into the street and caused a brawl, during which shots were fired, the police said.  Read more.

Swedish police lose control amid refugee crisis as number of 'no-go zones' rises to 55

The inflow of asylum seekers in Sweden, a country with one of the most liberal laws towards refugees, is putting an increasing strain on the country's police. There are now reportedly 55 areas in the country, where the law is not fully upheld.
Dubbed “no-go zones” in some media reports, there are now 55 areas in Swedish cities, where the police have significant problems in tackling crime. They are divided into three categories depending on how significant the risk to officers working there is.  Read more.

Inside DuPont and Monsanto's Migrant Labor Camps

An in-depth investigation reveals that multibillion-dollar Big Ag corporations—including DuPont Pioneer and Monsanto—as well as small-scale farmers routinely use labor recruiters who crowd migrant workers in housing riddled with health and safety violations, such as bed bug infestations and a lack of running water. A newly built public database of housing inspection records exposes the dramatic scope of the problem: When state inspectors visit migrant labor camps, they find violations as much as 60 percent of the time.  Read more.

Wells Fargo's Predatory Practices Are More Than Petty Frauds

In the wake of the financial crisis of 2008, would-be reformers of Wall Street have largely focused on the problems with letting big financial institutions mix commercial banking with investment banking. But the most recent banking scandal -- the revelation that Wells Fargo employees created millions of fake accounts for their customers in order to meet their sales targets -- is a reminder that big banks have an enormous drive to misbehave, even within the strict realm of traditional banking activities.  Read more.

Time for Congress to Stop Hollering at CEOs and Take Action

Last week, Congress engaged in a bipartisan barrage of CEO bashing.
The Senate Banking Committee assailed Wells Fargo CEO John Stumpf for pushing employees to create as many as two million bogus bank and credit card accounts without customer’s consent – making customers pay overdraft and late fees on accounts they never knew they had.  Read more.

Bruce Springsteen Calls Donald Trump a 'Moron'

Bruce Springsteen spent the summer playing stadiums with the E Street Band and preparing to release his autobiography, Born To Run, while largely staying clear of this year's presidential campaigns. In an excerpt from an extensive interview that will appear in the next issue of Rolling Stone, Springsteen shares his thoughts on Donald Trump and Hillary Clinton, while addressing his own absence from the trail.  Read more.

Obama vetoes bill allowing families of victims of the Sept. 11 attacks to sue Saudi Arabia

President Barack Obama on Friday vetoed legislation allowing families of victims of the Sept. 11 attacks to sue Saudi Arabia, which could prompt Congress to overturn his decision with a rare veto override, the first of his presidency.

Obama said the Justice Against Sponsors of Terrorism Act would hurt U.S. national security and harm important alliances...read more.

Trump’s Agenda: A Recipe for Civil Unrest

Donald Trump finally got around to demonizing African Americans. The only surprise is how long he took to get there. Early in the campaign season, he raged about Muslims and demanded they be barred from entering the country. He labeled Mexican immigrants “rapists.” He has insisted that a wall, built by the United States, paid for by Mexico, must rise along the southern border. But he held off on making broad, baseless generalizations about black people.  Read more.

Brazil's new president, Michel Temer, says Dilma Rousseff was impeached for refusing his economic agenda

Brazilian president Michel Temer let an open secret become explicitly clear during a speech to business and foreign policy leaders yesterday in New York. The country’s elected and now-removed President, Dilma Rousseff, was impeached because of her position on economic policy, rather than any alleged wrongdoing on her part, her installed successor admitted. Temer’s stunning, and seemingly unscripted, acknowledgement will surely bolster the view of impeachment opponents that Dilma’s removal was a “parliamentary coup d’etat.”  Read more.

Over 1,200 Historians, Archaeologists, Museum Directors Denounce DAPL

Standing with the Standing Rock Sioux, over 1,200 museum directors, archaeologists, anthropologists, and historians—people "familiar with the long history of desecration of Indigenous People's artifacts and remains worldwide"—have written to the Obama administration to denounce "further irreparable losses" that would accompany completion of the controversial Dakota Access Pipeline.  Read more.

US to provide more weapons to Saudia Arabia for slaughter in Yemen and elsewhere

The U.S. Senate on Wednesday voted overwhelmingly to dismiss a bipartisan bill that would have blocked a massive $1.15 billion weapons shipment to Saudi Arabia, to the dismay of peace groups and rights advocates who have called on the U.S. to end its support for the brutal Saudi bombing campaign in Yemen.  Read more.

Pesticide companies should "come clean" on mass killing of bees

Agrochemical giants Syngenta and Bayer discovered in their own tests that their pesticides caused severe harm to bees, according to unpublished documents obtained through a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request by the environmental group Greenpeace.
The companies conducted the trials on products that used the controversial pesticides known as neonicotinoids, or neonic...read more.

Pesticide companies should "come clean" on mass killing of bees

Agrochemical giants Syngenta and Bayer discovered in their own tests that their pesticides caused severe harm to bees, according to unpublished documents obtained through a Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) request by the environmental group Greenpeace.
The companies conducted the trials on products that used the controversial pesticides known as neonicotinoids, or neonic...read more.

Charlotte faces aftermath of protests ignited by fatal police shooting; 16 officers injured

Charlotte officials say they are preparing for more protests today following a night of violence over an officer-involved fatal shooting of an African-American man Tuesday in the University City area. The dead man was identified as Keith Lamont Scott, 43.
Sixteen police officers were injured Tuesday night in a series of clashes, and there were reports early Wednesday of motorists on Interstate 85 being hurt and their vehicles damaged when protesters threw rocks, bottles and traffic cones off interstate overpasses onto traffic below. Read more here.

Terence Crutcher: Civil Rights Groups Demand Justice for Unarmed Black Man Shot and Killed by Tulsa Police

Civil rights groups and family members of Terence Crutcher, an unarmed black man who was shot and killed by police in Tulsa, Oklahoma on Friday, are demanding justice for the slain father of four.
Dashboard and helicopter footage released late Monday shows Crutcher with his hands in the air as four police officers approach him, guns drawn and pointed at him, in the moments before he was shot.  Read more.

What Amy Goodman’s Arrest Warrant Means for the Dakota Access Pipeline and Free Speech

They call themselves water protectors, land defenders. Their numbers are major; they are record; they are inspiring. At its peak, the population at the occupation’s North Dakota base, known as Sacred Stone camp, is said to have reached 3,500, including members of nearly 300 tribes and Native nations that have joined forces with the Standing Rock Sioux, whose tribal lands are most immediately imperiled by the pipeline, as well as environmental activists and other sympathizers.  Read more.

Washington Post Calls for Prosecution of Edward Snoden

Three of the four media outlets which received and published large numbers of secret NSA documents provided by Edward Snowden – The Guardian, The New York Times and The Intercept – have called for the U.S. government to allow the NSA whistleblower to return to the U.S. with no charges. That’s the normal course for a news organization, which owes its sources duties of protection, and which – by virtue of accepting the source’s materials and then publishing them – implicitly declares the source’s information to be in the public interest.  Read more.

Inmates Launch Series of Work Stoppages to Protest ‘Slave Labor’

Prisoners in dozens of correctional facilities around the nation launched a labor strike Sept. 9, a day that, appropriately, was the 45th anniversary of New York’s Attica prison rebellion. The U.S. incarcerates the greatest number of people in the world, and most of them are expected to work inside the prisons that hold them, usually for well below minimum wage.
Inmates say the system is akin to slavery and hence unconstitutional.  Read more.

New York Explosion Injures Dozens

At least 29 people suffered minor injuries in an explosion in a busy part of New York that the city's mayor said appeared to be intentional, adding there was no evidence of a "terror connection".
"There is no specific and credible threat against New York City at this point in time from any terror organisation," Mayor Bill de Blasio told a news conference.  Read more.
A mentally ill black man who died in a Milwaukee prison in April suffered from severe dehydration, a medical examiner concluded. Inmates said he was begging for drinking water days before perishing in custody.  Read more.

Libyan rebels ‘miss Gaddafi’ after years of chaos created by Western intervention

Libyans who mounted a revolution against Colonel Muammar Gaddafi now miss the stability provided by the old order because of the savage violence into which the country has descended, it is reported. The testimony has emerged in a number of on-the-ground interviews carried out by the Daily Mail and comes only days after a ... read more.

Transgender celebrity Alexis Arquette dies at 47

The Arquette family have paid tribute to their daughter Alexis Arquette and commended her fight for the “understanding and acceptance” of the transgender community.
Alexis died early on Sunday morning in Los Angeles at the age of 47, surrounded by her family as they sung David Bowie’s ‘Starman’. A cause of death is not yet known.  Read more.

The Lady Chablis, transgender nightclub star, dies aged 59

The Lady Chablis, the transgender nightclub star from Savannah, Georgia, who successfully lobbied Clint Eastwood to play herself in his 1997 adaptation of the John Berendt novel Midnight in the Garden of Good and Evil, has reportedly passed away at the age of 59.
Chablis, who told Entertainment Tonight in 1996 that she changed her legal name to reflect her long-time stage name (including the “The”), was a drag star who also lived publicly as a woman.  Read more.

Wells Fargo fired 5,300 workers for improper sales push. The executive in charge is retiring with $125 million.

When Wells Fargo was hit last week with $185 million in fines after thousands of its employees were caught setting up fake accounts customers didn't ask for, regulators heralded the settlement as a breakthrough.
The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau noted that the $100 million it will collect as part of the deal was the agency's "largest penalty" ever.  Read more.

Corporate Tax Deserters Shouldn't Get the Benefits of Being American Corporations

Apple is only the latest big global American corporation to use foreign tax shelters to avoiding paying its fair share of U.S. taxes. It’s just another form of corporate desertion.
Corporations are deserting America by hiding their profits abroad or even shifting their corporate headquarters to another nation because they want lower taxes abroad. Read more.

The Federal Poverty Line is Too Damn Low

The U.S. Census Bureau’s announcement today that the number of Americans living below the poverty line fell between 2014 and 2015 is good news. But before we get too excited, it is worth noting that the federal poverty line was a meager $12,000 for a single person living alone in 2015 (and only about $24,000 for a married couple living with two children).  Read more.

9/11 Wars Have Cost Nearly $5 Trillion

The U.S. military interventions in Iraq and Afghanistan have cost taxpayers nearly $5 trillion and counting, according to a new report released to coincide with the 15th anniversary of the attacks.
Dr. Neta Crawford, professor of political science at Brown University, released the figures in an independent analysis (pdf) of U.S. Departments of Defense, State, Homeland Security, and Veteran Affairs spending, as well as their base and projected future spending.  Read more.

Facebook and Israeli Government Team Up to Censor the World

LAST WEEK, A MAJOR censorship controversy erupted when Facebook began deleting all posts containing the iconic photograph of the Vietnamese “Napalm Girl” on the ground that it violated the company’s ban on “child nudity.” Facebook even deleted a post from the prime minister of Norway, who posted the photograph in protest of the censorship. As outrage spread, Facebook ultimately reversed itself — acknowledging “the history and global importance of this image in documenting a particular moment in time” — but this episode illustrated...read more.

Protests at 27 state capitals and Washington, D.C. demanding equality and justice for all

Demanding that elected officials and candidates for office embrace morally just policies that include living wages, health care for all, racial justice, and union rights, thousands of workers led by clergy are holding protests at 27 state capitals and Washington, D.C. on Monday.
Dubbed the Higher Ground Moral Day of Action, the demonstrations are being spearheaded by Rev. Dr. William J. Barber II, president of the North Carolina NAACP and architect of the Moral Mondays movement, and accompanied by activists with the national Fight for $15 movement.  Read more.

Hillary Clinton diagnosed with pneumonia, put on antibiotics

The health of 68-year-old Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton has again fallen under the media spotlight, but this time due to a serious health issue. Less than two months from elections, Clinton has been confirmed to be suffering from pneumonia.
Dr. Lisa Bardack, Clinton’s personal doctor since 2001, released a statement through the Clinton campaign which said the former secretary of state had been diagnosed with pneumonia during a follow-up examination regarding her prolonged cough.  Read more.

High School Football Players Take Knee for Anthem Across Country

High school football players across the US followed San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick's lead and declined to stand for the national anthem Friday night and Saturday afternoon.
It appears that Kaepernick has started a movementwith his silent protest during the national anthem during a pre-season game on August 26. Kaepernick said his "taking a knee" was to protest racial oppression and police brutality in the United States.  Read more.

Alabama pastor and high school football announcer says those not standing for anthem should be shot

The announcer of the Friday night football game at McKenzie High School in Alabama's Butler County had something to say to those who may choose not to stand for the national anthem.
"If you don't want to stand for the national anthem, you can line up over there by the fence and let our military personnel take a few shots at you since they're taking shots for you," the announcer said at the game versus Houston County High School, according to Facebook poster Denise Crowley-Whitfield.  Read more.

Clinton falls ill at 9/11 memorial, later says 'feeling great'

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton fell ill on Sunday as she became "overheated" and had to leave early from a September 11 memorial ceremony in New York City.
Clinton, 68, was taken to her daughter Chelsea's home in Manhattan, and emerged later wearing sunglasses and telling reporters that she was "feeling great," around two hours after she left the event on a hot and muggy morning.  Read more.

'A Good Day for Elephants': Ban on Domestic Ivory Trade Passes

In a bid to stop the killing of elephants for their tusks, world governments voted at a major conservation conference to urge the closure of all domestic ivory markets.
After fierce debate, disagreements and walkouts the motion was adopted on the final day of the International Union for Conservation of Nature World Conservation Congress, a 10-day meeting that drew 9,000 people to Honolulu, Hawaii this month.  Read more.

Arrest Warrant Issued for Amy Goodman in North Dakota After Covering Pipeline Protest

An arrest warrant has been issued in North Dakota for Democracy Now! host and executive producer Amy Goodman. Goodman was charged with criminal trespassing, a misdemeanor offense. A team from Democracy Now! was in North Dakota last week to cover the Native American-led protests against the Dakota Access pipeline.  Read more.

Arrest Warrant Issued for Amy Goodman in North Dakota After Covering Pipeline Protest

An arrest warrant has been issued in North Dakota for Democracy Now! host and executive producer Amy Goodman. Goodman was charged with criminal trespassing, a misdemeanor offense. A team from Democracy Now! was in North Dakota last week to cover the Native American-led protests against the Dakota Access pipeline.  Read more.

Kaepernick anthem protests spark controversy in NHL

Tampa Bay Lightning forward J.T. Brown has hit out at Team USA Coach John Tortorella over his comments about sports stars refusing to stand for the national anthem – a trend recently set by NFL quarterback Colin Kaepernick.
"If any of my players sit on the bench for the national anthem, they will sit there the rest of the game," Tortorella told ESPN on Tuesday, in response to a question about NFL quarterback Kaepernick's protests about the treatment of minorities in the US.  Read more.

Thousands of Prisoners Strike Against Forced Labor

'A Call to End Slavery': Nationwide Prison Strike Kicks Off

Prisoners across the United States are launching a massive strike on Friday, on the 45th anniversary of the Attica prison uprising, to protest what they call modern-day slavery.
Organizers say the strike will take place in at least 24 states to protest inhumane living and working conditions, forced labor, and the cycle of the criminal justice system itself. In California alone, 800 people are expected to take part in the work stoppage. It is slated to be one of the largest strikes in history.  Read more.

Shooter dead, student & police officer injured at West Texas high school

A female student and a police officer were shot and injured at Alpine High School in West Texas. The shooter appears to have committed suicide, police said. All schools in the Alpine Independent School District are on “critical lockdown.”
The shooter was also female, Brewster County Sheriff Ronny told Alpine Radio. Five shots were fired.  Read more.

Activists point fingers at police over suspicious death of Ferguson protester Darren Seals

The violent murder of Ferguson Uprising protester Darren Seals, who was found shot and burned in a charred car Tuesday near the US city of St Louis, has raised “a lot of red flags” for activists, who question the official version of events released by his “enemies,” the police.
Seals, who described himself as a “revolutionary, activist and unapologetically black,” helped lead protests after the shooting of unarmed teenager Michael Brown by white police officer Darren Wilson in the St Louis suburb of Ferguson in 2014.  Read more.

Some see anti-women backlash in ouster of Rousseff

At one heated moment in the impeachment trial of Dilma Rousseff, a senator pushing for her ouster decided that some of his outspoken female colleagues in the chamber needed scolding.
“Calm down, girls,” the senator, Cássio Cunha Lima, part of a political dynasty from northeastern Brazil, told Senators Vanessa Grazziotin and Gleisi Hoffmann, both supporters of Rousseff, Brazil’s first female president.  Read more.

Costa Rica Has Been Running on 100 Percent Renewable Energy for Months

Costa Rica's electrical grid ran on 100 percent renewable energy between June 17 and September 2, according to a report published Tuesday by the state-owned energy company, Instituto Costarricense de Electricidad (ICE), which controls energy production and distribution. (Data after September 2 has not yet been released.)  Read more.

Beyond Apartheid and Genocide -- Justice for the Movement for Black Lives and Palestine

A recent statement issued by the Movement for Black Lives, a coalition of 60 grassroots organizations, describes Israel as "an apartheid state with over 50 laws on the books that sanction discrimination against the Palestinian people." Progressive organizations from all over the world have endorsed the platform, to end state violence and genocide against Black people.  Read more.

Prominent Scholars Decry TPP's "Frontal Attack" on Law and Democracy

More than 200 legal and economic scholars—including President Barack Obama's Harvard Law School mentor Laurence Tribe—have penned a letter to Congress warning that the pro-corporate Investor-State Dispute Settlement (ISDS) regime enshrined in the Trans Pacific Partnership (TPP) "threatens the rule of law and undermines our nation's democratic institutions."  Read more.

Palestinian students build solar car to beat Israeli fuel blockade

Israel’s continued blockade of Palestinian territory along the Gaza Strip has not only infringed on residents’ human rights, but also choked the area of essential resources such as fuel.
Authorities in Jerusalem control much of Palestine’s energy sources and supplies through its Israel Electric Corporation, as well as heavily restricting imports.
Two students from the Islamic Al Azhar University in the center of Gaza are seeking to swerve the energy limitations that have dogged the area for many years by creating a solar-powered vehicle on a shoestring budget.  Read more.

Black Male Teachers a Dwindling Demographic

Ron Porter Jr. had a rude awakening during his senior year at Millersville University in central Pennsylvania more than two decades ago. A student-athlete at the central Pennsylvania college, Porter thought that a bachelor’s degree in history was all he needed to become a teacher. He hadn’t consulted an academic adviser and didn’t realize he also needed to take other steps, such as completing classes in education theory and fulfilling student-teaching requirements. It wasn't until a friend and classmate mentioned his own student-teaching plans that Porter realized his mistake.  Read more.

Muslim Migrant Wave Unleashes Danish Tensions Over Identity

Johnny Christensen, a stout and silver-whiskered retired bank employee, always thought of himself as sympathetic to people fleeing war and welcoming to immigrants. But after more than 36,000 mostly Muslim asylum seekers poured into Denmark over the past two years, Mr. Christensen, 65, said, “I’ve become a racist.”
He believes these new migrants are draining Denmark’s cherished social-welfare system but failing to adapt to its customs. “Just kick them out,” he said, unleashing a mighty kick at an imaginary target on a suburban sidewalk. “These Muslims want to keep their own culture, but we have our own rules here and everyone must follow them.”  Read more.

Reagan Sold Your Future, Trump Will Too

Two generations ago, many white working-class Democrats bought into Ronald Reagan's promise of a better nation. Eager for "morning in America" -- and swayed by fear that advances for black people would come at their expense -- they didn't see that the shadow of a long sunset was creeping over their lives.
Because the GOP had another, darker agenda. One that didn't include them.
Reagan Democrats were left with a president who blamed and criticized people of color, while billionaires got to enjoy a president who helped them grab the lion's share of America's wealth.  Read more.

Oklahoma sees dozens of fracking water wells shut down after major earthquake

The authorities in Oklahoma have shut down 37 wastewater wells used by the fracking industry to extract oil and gas after a 5.6-magnitude earthquake rocked the area on Saturday, equaling the biggest quake to hit the state.
Oklahoma Governor Mary Fallin tweeted that the decision to shut down the wells was a “mandatory directive” and the total area of interest is 725 sq. miles.  Read more.

New York Times distorted journalism implies Wikileaks bowing to Russia

Without any evidence whatsoever, the New York Times published a “special report” tying the operations of WikiLeaks to Russian leader Vladimir Putin. Times reporters strongly suggested, “whether by conviction, convenience, or coincidence,” WikiLeaks’ document releases, along with statements by its editor-in-chief Julian Assange, have “often benefited Russia at the expense of the West.”
This kind of journalism has historically been labeled yellow journalism. It is a crude exaggeration and distorting of reality aimed at sensationalism. Times reporters fuel a manufactured idea that somehow WikiLeaks is a Russian pawn of Prime Minister Vladimir Putin in the country’s new Cold War against the United States.  Read more.

Millions of Indian workers strike for human decency through better wages and state enfranchisement

Tens of millions of public sector workers have gone on a day-long strike across India, protesting against Prime Minister Narendra Modi's economic policies, particularly his plans to push for greater privatisation.
Thousands of state-run banks, government offices and factories were closed on Friday, and public transport disrupted, in the strike called by 10 trade unions.  Read more.

Harry Belafonte on Colin Kaepernick's National Anthem Protest: 'It's a Noble Thing That He's Done'

Legendary singer and civil rights activist Harry Belafonte minced no words this week when asked about his reaction to San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick's decision to stay seated during the National Anthem in his team's pre-season games. 
"To mute the slave has always been to the best interests of the slave owner," Belafonte said...read more.

Colin Kaepernick Isn't Unpatriotic, Levi's Is

Even though the season doesn't start for another two weeks, the National Football League is already embroiled in controversy.
The latest lightning rod for sports radio hot takes is San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick, who surprised pretty much everyone last week when he refused to stand for the national anthem during a preseason game against the Green Bay Packers.
When asked why he did what he did, Kaepernick said he was trying to raise awareness about the fact that this country isn't living up to the motto of "liberty and justice for all."  Read more.