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Showing posts from July, 2017

Hackers Demonstrate How to Crack Into Electronic Voting Machines in Minutes

Who says America's electronic voting machinery cannot be hacked?
One of the world's largest and best-known hacker conventions, DEF CON, debuted an interactive "Voting Machine Hacker Village" this year at its annual gathering in Las Vegas. In some cases within minutes, and in other cases within a few hours, of the village doors' opening, hackers in attendance said they had successfully breached some systems. The security investigators claimed to have found major vulnerabilities or claimed to have breached every voting machine and system present.  Read more.

Refugees on the Pass of Death between Italy and France

The Carabinieri station chief exits the patrol car, lights a cigar and gazes over the little stone wall at the winding coastline below. It's sunset and the hilltop hamlet just 1.5km from the French border is famed for its vistas. It's also where many refugees begin a perilous hike across the "Pass of Death" to cross the mountainous border into France.  Read more

NAACP Centennial: 100 Years Ago African-Americans Marched Down 5th Avenue in Protest

The only sounds were those of muffled drums, the shuffling of feet and the gentle sobs of some of the estimated 20,000 onlookers. The women and children wore all white. The men dressed in black.
On the afternoon of Saturday, July 28, 1917, nearly 10,000 African-Americans marched down Fifth Avenue, in silence, to protest racial violence and white supremacy in the United States.  Read more.

Scaramucci: 'Not Trying to Suck My Own Cock...I'm Here To Serve the Country'

In a profanity-laced and on-the-record conversation with New Yorker political reporter Ryan Lizza, President Donald Trump's White House communications director Anthony Scaramucci—who took the job less than a week ago—attacked senior White House advisor Steven Bannon, Trump's chief of staff Reince Priebus, and other unnamed officials saying he would "fire all of them" if the journalist did not divulge the person who leaked recent information from the White House.  Read more.

Ohio Plans to Restart Executions with Drugs Known to Torture

After a three-and-a-half year moratorium, Ohio is poised to start executions again with the killing of Ronald Phillips by lethal injection on July 26. It will also mark the beginning of 27 planned executions that will make Ohio one of the most active capital punishment states north of Texas. But Gov. John Kasich can stop this execution spree before it starts.  Read more.

Trump’s Boy Scouts Speech Is a Reminder of How Different the Girls Scouts Organization Is

If you’d like to test whether your human capacity for shock has been overworked to the point of total ruin by Donald Trump’s presidency, watch his Monday evening address to the Boy Scouts of America’s quadrennial jamboree. Every beat more self-obsessed, petty, and hateful than the last, the speech found Trump cussing and alluding to sexual exploits in front of a crowd of children, congratulating himself and demeaning his ideological opponents at an event that has pretty much steered clear of partisanship for 80 years.  Read more.

Boy Scouts Jamboree Compared to Hitler Youth Rally After Trump's Speech

The annual Boy Scout Jamboree faced comparisons to a Hitler Youth Rally following President Donald Trump's speech at the event on Monday night. The president spoke to 24,000 Scouts ranging in age from 12 to 18, as eight presidents have before him. Unlike previous presidents, however, Trump appeared to view the event as an opportunity to slam his political opponents and the news media, call for "loyalty," and rail against the "cesspool" of Washington, D.C., as the audience cheered.  Read more.

UK Banks Profit from Israeli Crimes against Palestinians

How the Food and Drug Companies Ensure that We Get Sick and They Make Money

Another reason for single-payer health care: The documentary What the Health shows how the lives and health of human beings are considered insignificant, and in many ways threatened, by the pursuit of profits in the meat and dairy and drug industries. 
The corporate disdain revealed by this film is nearly beyond belief. And our 'trusted' watchdog agencies, both non-profit and government, are...read more.

When a police shooting victim is a white woman

The reaction to a police shooting sure looks different when the victim is a white woman.
There’s a typical story that plays out in the aftermath of police shootings. One side, critical of police, comes out pointing to the excesses of police brutality, particularly in cases in which officers killed black men and boys. The other side, supportive of police, comes out pointing to the nuances of the cases and perhaps the ways that the victims are to blame for their deaths — he had a criminal record, he didn’t listen to the police, and so on.  Read more.

Poland President Andrzej Duda to veto judiciary reform

Poland's President Andrzej Duda has announced he will veto two contentious bills that are widely seen as assaults on the independence of the judicial system and are part of a planned legal overhaul by the ruling party that has sparked days of nationwide protests.
On Saturday, the upper house gave final approval to a bill that would remove all...read more.

Martin Schulz must drum up more support if he wants to unseat three-term Chancellor Angela Merkel

A "You know me already" campaign slogan carried Angela Merkel and her CDU party to victory four years ago. The chancellor's opinion polls are pointing up and durchmerkeln - "Merkeling through," or the ability to reassure voters without offering any concrete policy positions - might once again suffice to gain yet another term in office.  Read more,.

Yemen crisis 'an absolute shame on humanity'

International human rights organisation CARE has denounced the humanitarian crisis in war-torn Yemen, which is also suffering from a cholera epidemic, as "an absolute shame on humanity".
Wolfgang Jamann, the head of the NGO, raised alarm over the country's deteriorating situation since March 2015 when Saudi-led forces launched a military operation in support of...read more

Global renewable energy capacity jumped 8% in 2016

The world added a record amount of renewable energy in 2016 despite a sharp drop in investment, the UN said Thursday, largely due to falling costs of clean energy.
New renewable energy, excluding large hydro projects, added 138.5 gigawatts of power in 2016, up eight percent from the previous year.  The new capacity came despite...read more.

The reason Colin Kaepernick doesn't have a job

Former San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick was in the news recently, in a story that gives me a nagging, uneasy feeling about the health of our republic.
Kaepernick is the professional football player who experienced considerable notoriety last season by declining to stand during the pregame rendition of the national anthem. He was protesting the history of racism in our country, as well as its current manifestations. In the spring, Kaepernick exercised his free agency option and left the 49ers.  Read more.

Mexico City expands program to recognize gender identity

On Saturday Mexico City received more than 2,000 trans people from 24 states to distribute the first birth certificates that acknowledge the true gender identities of petitioners from outside of the district. They lined up outside the capital's recently inaugurated Plaza de la Identidad (Plaza of Identity) in front of the municipal's civil register.  Read more.

Madrid asks anti-trust watchdog to probe Uber's new airport service

Authorities in Madrid asked Spain's anti-trust watchdog on Saturday to investigate whether Uber's new low-cost airport transfer service constitutes unfair competition.
The city council's request follows the ride-hailing app's return to the Spanish capital last year after the CNMC competition regulator called for the...read more.

Underneath the Vick-Kaepernick Dust-Up: Black Respectability Politics

On Monday, former NFL quarterback Michael Vick appeared on FS1’s Speak for Yourself, and when asked about any advice he could give to former San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick, who still has not signed with a new team, Vick said, “First thing we’ve got to get Colin to do is cut his hair” if he wants a team to sign him.
To no one’s surprise, Twitter lambasted Vick left and right. And on Tuesday, Kaepernick tweeted the definition of Stockholm Syndrome (it “appears when an abused victim develops a kind of respect and empathy towards their abuser,” reads the beginning of Kaepernick’s tweet), obviously taking a...read more.

Michael Vick apologizes for saying Colin Kaepernick should cut his hair

Michael Vick apologized for saying earlier this week that free-agent quarterback Colin Kaepernick should cut his hair to help change his image.
Appearing on "The Dan Patrick Show" on Thursday, the retired NFL quarterback said he was "truly sorry" for making the comments Tuesday on Kaepernick's hair during an appearance on FS1's "Speak For Yourself." Vick's comments quickly went viral and have been criticized widely in the media.  Read more.

Seattle's Innovative Campaign Finance Reform Spurs Resistance

In 2015, Seattle voters passed an initiative creating the nation's first "democracy voucher" program through which each resident gets four $25 vouchers they can give to any candidate who agrees to abide by certain solicitation and spending limits. The law passed by a whopping 20-point margin, confirming that Seattle voters agree with the 85 percent of Americans who believe our campaign finance system needs a major overhaul. Now, however, a group called the Pacific Legal Foundation (PLF) has filed a lawsuit alleging the program violates the First Amendment.  Read more.

HBO’s ‘Confederate’ Romanticizes White Supremacy

So, there’s a new kid in town! Actually the arrival is being heralded on the exiting heels of the profitable and world-wide phenom: Game of Thrones — an intriguing fantastical blockbuster that The Force Awakens heartthrob John Boyega, recently described as a show that showcases “no Black people.” His statement is actually worth quoting due to it’s impeccable timing:  Read more.

Empire Files: Anti-Black Racism Reveals Israel's White Supremacy

Lies and the Lying Lobbyists Who Tell Them

The greatest problem in Washington is not polarization but lying. The legislative machinery has ground to a halt not because of the great divide between liberals and conservatives but because of the great divide between the lobbyists and the people. The lobbyists want things that are against the public interest, and they use lies and secrecy to try to win. The collapse of the Obamacare repeal demonstrates the limits of this corruption.  Read more.

Worker Wages Flat, But Since 1978 CEO Pay Has Soared by 'Outrageous' 937%

Wages for most American workers have remained basically stagnant for decades, but a new report published on Thursday by the Economic Policy Institute (EPI) shows that the CEOs of America's largest firms have seen their pay soar at a consistent and "outrageous" clip.
Between 1978 and 2016, CEO pay rose by 937 percent, EPI's Lawrence Mishel and Jessica Schieder found. By contrast, the typical worker saw "painfully slow" compensation growth—11.2 percent over the same period.  Read more.

Ranchers Fight Keystone XL Pipeline by Building Solar Panels in Its Path

After years of battling Canadian pipeline giant TransCanada over the controversial Keystone XL pipeline, Nebraska rancher Bob Allpress is taking an unusual step to protect land that has been in his family since 1886.
In the coming weeks, Allpress plans to install solar panels in the middle of a 1.5-mile long strip of land, a proposed pipeline route that...read more.

Rover Gas Pipeline Builder Faces Investigation by Federal Regulators

Federal regulators will investigate Energy Transfer Partners, the company behind the controversial Dakota Access pipeline in North Dakota, for alleged violations associated with its $4.2 billion Rover natural gas pipeline in Ohio.
The investigation comes as the number of violations and fines against the company over the Rover project continue to grow.  Read more.

Dead Civilians and the Language of War

Finally it comes down to this: Some people are expendable.
In certain parts of the world — where we and our allies are waging war — the expendable people come in two categories: terrorists (good riddance!) and civilians, whom we only kill if and when necessary, and whose deaths often elicit official apologies (if there’s no way to deny it was our fault).
Indeed, as Secretary of Defense James Mattis said, according to the Daily Beast, “There has been no change to our continued extraordinary efforts to avoid innocent civilian casualties.”  Read more.

Baltimore Public Defender Says Body Camera Shows Cop Planting Drugs

China punishes 210,000 officials for corruption

Chinese authorities have punished more than 210,000 officials for corruption in the first half of 2017, according to the Communist Party's corruption watchdog.
In a statement on Thursday, the Central Commission for Discipline Inspection (CCDI) said anti-corruption institutions received 1.31 million complaints and opened 260,000 cases this year.  Read more.

'Message Loud and Clear' Says NAACP After Latest Trump Snub

President Donald Trump's decision to decline an invitation to attend the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People's 108th annual convention, "underscores the harsh fact: we have lost—we've lost the will of the current Administration to listen to issues facing the Black community," said Leon Russell, the group's board chairman.  Read more.

Nurses, Protesters Tell Corrupt Democrats Single-Payer Healthcare Can't Wait

Casting an Arab in the role of Aladdin will not correct the film's inherent racism

Controversy ensued immediately after Disney announced that it would remake Aladdin, the cartoon fantasy film released in 1992. The outcry centred largely on the casting for the film, and specifically, who would play the roles of Aladdin and Jasmine. 
For Disney, Aladdin is far more than just a film. It is a multimillion-dollar franchise - one that encompasses...read more.

‘Go back to Africa’ Florida mayoral candidate tells blacks who seek reparations

A Republican long-shot candidate in Florida’s St. Petersburg mayoral race told those calling for reparations for African-Americans who endured slavery and oppression to “go back to Africa” if they don’t like it in America.
Paul Congemi, 60, was at a forum in the Florida city when he addressed his campaign opponent...read more.

Prison podcast tells of life in San Quentin

A bunk bed with mattresses. A toilet and sink side by side. Two lockers. A television. A handful of permitted appliances. Pictures of family, friends and loved ones pinned up on the walls. Six cubic feet of personal belongings. And two men.
This is the claustrophobic scene inside most of the drab, four-by-nine feet (1.2 metres by 2.7 metres) cells in the infamous San Quentin State Prison, a medium security institution in northern California.  Read more.

Joining Single-Payer Chorus, Al Gore Says For-Profit System Had Its Chance

On the heels of what appeared to be Trumpcare's final collapse on Monday and in the midst of growing grassroots demands for Democratic lawmakers to embrace a "bold" agenda, former Vice President Al Gore said at an event on Tuesday that he believes the United States should move toward a single-payer system that guarantees healthcare for every American.  Read more.

Israeli Restrictions at Al-Aqsa Mosque Spark Protests

Wealthy Investors Gouge Fixed-Income Renters

A "rentier" is defined in the Random House Dictionary as "a person who has a fixed income, as from lands or bonds." The rentier class consists of those who essentially earn money off of investments instead of working on an hourly or daily wage. Many of the people who rent housing from rentiers -- in other words, renters -- live on another form of fixed income altogether: social security. Others work long hours at low-paying jobs. Renters often can't afford to own their apartments or homes, and, therefore, other entities -- including, increasingly, investment firms -- are financially benefiting from their need for shelter.  Read more.

Maduro's July 30 vote to go ahead amid Trump threat

Venezuela's government has announced it will go ahead with a controversial election of a Constituent Assembly on July 30, despite a threat of economic sanctions by US President Donald Trump.
"Elections to the National Constituent Assembly is an act of political sovereignty. Nothing and nobody can stop it. The Constituent Assembly is happening" Foreign Minister Samuel Moncada said in a speech at the foreign ministry office.  Read more.

Black America is “Pro-Peace,” but Its Politicians Work for the War Party

The Black Alliance for Peace will have to work around or against the Black Misleadership Class. “For these infinitely self-centered creatures, even the Mother Continent is unworthy of basic human empathy, much less solidarity.” The Congressional Black Caucus won’t even complain of genocide in the Congo, much less war against Syria. Even the Movement for Blacks Lives’ position on peace is weak. Malcolm, MLK and Du Bois would disapprove.  Read more.

Poverty, Privilege, and the Dead American Dream

Once upon a time, I believed in the American Dream. 
In fact, I once believed myself to be living proof that it existed. I bought into the notion that if one worked hard enough, one could be upwardly mobile no matter the adversity they faced. I thought that the only limitations to achievement in the United States were laziness and stupidity. I looked around me at all the people who were not achieving some form of the American Dream and decided that they were to blame for their circumstances.  Read more.

Veterans Call on US to Sign Nuclear Ban Treaty

On July 7th, 2017, the United Nations (UN), in a historic decision, approved a legally binding instrument to ban nuclear weapons, the Treaty on the Prohibition of Nuclear Weapons. Months of negotiations involving over 130 countries began in March of this year, culminating in a final draft endorsed by 122 countries. The treaty marks a significant milestone to help free the world of nuclear weapons.  Read more.

Indentured Servitude Has Already Penetrated Deep into the American Heartland

Indentured servitude is back in a big way in the United States, and conservative corporatists want to make sure that labor never, ever again has the power to tell big business how to treat them.
Idaho, for example, recently passed a law that recognizes and rigorously enforces non-compete agreements in employment contracts, which means that...read more.

Japan Plans to Expose Its People and 2020 Tokyo Olympians to Fukushima Radiation

Former nuclear industry senior vice president Arnie Gunderson, who managed and coordinated projects at 70 US atomic power plants, is appalled at how the Japanese government is handling the Fukushima nuclear crisis.
"The inhumanity of the Japanese government toward the Fukushima disaster refugees is appalling," Gunderson, a licensed reactor operator with 45 years of nuclear power engineering experience and the...read more.

Mumia Abu-Jamal Speaks About Black Lives Matter and Police Violence

In his new book Have Black Lives Ever Mattered?, author and activist Mumia Abu-Jamal explores this question over 75 essays, spanning from the late 1990s to 2017. Each essay explores the violence of policing and the criminal legal system, whether from a historical perspective or through the stories of people who have died by the hands of police. In the first essay, "Hate Crimes," Abu-Jamal questions the legitimacy of the idea of hate crimes, pointing out that police are never charged with a hate crime when they brutalize and kill Black and Brown people. Abu-Jamal's essays discuss the murder of Trayvon Martin by George Zimmerman, the killing of Tamir Rice by Cleveland, Ohio, police officer Timothy Loehmann, and what the aftermath of these slayings reveals about how the United States views Black people.  Read more.

Ida B Wells: The Story of America's First Black Female Investigative Journalist

Amazon Buys Whole Foods: Enter the Grocery Store Nightmare

Wall Street analysts tell us that Amazon’s $14 billion buyout of Whole Foods isn't only a win-win for both of them, but also for consumers, for Amazon intends to lower the organic grocer's prices.
Really? Yes, they say, because Amazon will use its amazing computer-driven tactics to cut Whole Foods' cost of selling groceries.  Read more.

New Lawsuit Aims to Stop Trump's 'Sham Commission' Dead in its Tracks

As the White House releases 112 pages of colorful comments—and personal information—after it asked for the public to weigh in on its so-called Election Integrity Commission and received an overwhelmingly negative response, a new lawsuit aims to protect voters' privacy rights by stopping the controversial commission's sweeping data demand.
The Trump-established commission, headed by Vice President Mike Pence with...read more.

Temer Signs Law That Could See Millions of Acres Lost in the Amazon

On 11 July, President Michel Temer signed into law important new legislation (MP 759) that paves the way for land thieves, who have illegally occupied and cleared vast areas of public land in the Amazon, to legalize their land holdings. The changes introduced by the legislation will make it easier — and very cheap — for wealthy land grabbers (even those who illegally occupied land fairly recently) to gain property rights over vast areas.  Read more.

Ferguson Activist Ashley Yates Talks Oakland, Assata Shakur and Black Woman Leadership

Ashley Yates is co-founder of the Ferguson-based grassroots organization Millennial Activists United (MAU). Originally from Florissant, Missouri, Yates was one of the early on-the-ground organizers following the unjust police murder of Mike Brown on August 9, 2014. In 2015, she was a Black Lives Matter representative at the United Nations in Geneva, Switzerland.  Read more.

Among Wealthiest Nations, US Healthcare System Comes in Dead Last

In the midst of a deeply unpopular attempt by the Republican Party to pass legislation that could leave 22 million more Americans uninsured and as support for Medicare for All soars, a new analysis published on Friday by the Washington-based Commonwealth Fund finds that the U.S. healthcare system currently ranks last among 11 other advanced countries in healthcare outcomes, access, equity, and efficiency.  Read more.

Trump Jr. Emails and Meeting With Russian Lawyer Are Probable Cause of Federal Crime

It is a federal crime for any person to "solicit, accept or receive" from a foreign national a monetary contribution or "other thing of value" which is given "for the purpose of influencing any election for Federal office."  The element of "other thing of value" can be satisfied by opposition research, for which candidates regularly pay research firms. It is not necessary that the defendant actually receive the thing of value. The crime is complete upon the solicitation.  Read more.

War & Cholera Decimate Yemen, But Saudi Bombing Gets More US Help

Obituary: Liu Xiaobo

Liu Xiaobo, a Nobel peace laureate who spent almost a quarter of his life behind bars in China for advocating human rights and democracy, has died at the age of 61.
Liu, a prominent dissident since the 1989 Tiananmen Square pro-democracy protests, died from multiple organ failure on Thursday, having not been allowed to leave the country for treatment for late-stage liver cancer.  Read more.

UN Adopts Historic Nuclear Weapons Ban over US-Led Opposition

Tufts Medical Center Nurses Go On Strike

Hundreds of nurses lined the sidewalks in front of Tufts Medical Center Wednesday in what the union says is the largest nursing strike in Massachusetts history.
It is also the first nurses strike in Boston in 30 years.
The strike began at 7 a.m. as night shift workers left their wards to form picket lines. Iron workers, builders, teachers, service employees and other union...read more.

Florida cops struggle to explain to black state attorney why she was pulled over

Bodycam footage of two Orlando police officers pulling over Florida’s first and only black state attorney has gone viral. The cops, now accused of racial profiling, claimed her tags didn’t come back as registered and also eyed her legally tinted windows.
On Wednesday, the Orlando Police Department (OPD) released the bodycam footage from an officer who pulled over State Attorney Aramis Ayala on June 19.  Read more.

Ending the Ronald Reagan Lie

As they return from the July Fourth break, the Republican leadership is twisting in agony on the Obamacare repeal and it couldn’t happen to a more miserable bunch. President Trump, House Speaker Paul Ryan, and Senate majority leader Mitch McConnell have been trying to jam through a deeply unpopular and cruel piece of legislation, but for once the public is being heard over the lobbyists. And the public is shouting a loud and hopefully decisive “no.” But the problem is deeper than health care, and goes back to Ronald Reagan’s great lie.  Read more.

There is no justice for the poor in Brazil

In June 2013, at a time when Brazil was shaken by mass protests against government spending, a homeless young man called Rafael Braga Vieira was arrested in Rio de Janerio for carrying two bottles of cleaning products. 
Among several other arrests that occurred during this period, Braga's was one of the most shocking and unjust.  Read more.

UN Adopts Historic Nuclear Weapons Ban over US-Led Opposition

A Brief History of the KKK with Gerald Horne

India suspends ban on trade of cattle for slaughter

India's Supreme Court on Tuesday suspended a government ban on sale and purchase of cattle for slaughter.
The new law, which was announced in May by Prime Minister Narendra Modi's federal government, had placed a nationwide ban on the sale and purchase of cattle for slaughter at animal markets, allowing cattle trade only for plowing and dairy production.  Read more.

Australian journalist demolishes Trump at G20: 'biggest threat to the west'

A savage opinion of Donald Trump’s presidency that went viral was delivered by one of Australia’s most seasoned political journalists, who is well known to viewers of the national broadcaster for his frank opinions.
Chris Uhlmann, the political editor of the government-funded Australian Broadcasting Corporation, described Trump as “isolated and friendless” at the G20 leaders’ summit, and said his disastrous foreign policy had “pressed fast-forward on the decline of the United States”.  Read more.

Why Jewish Institutions Must Divest From State Violence

In the weeks before the horrific murder of Charleena Lyles, a Black woman and mother of four killed by members of the Seattle Police Department (SPD) on June 18, we learned that the Jewish Federation of Greater Seattle planned to present the SPD its "Tikkun Olam" award. Tikkun Olam, or repairing the world, is a central concept of Jewish social justice, and we shared outrage with many progressive Jews in Seattle that a police department -- especially one currently under court supervision for excessive force and racially biased policing -- would receive such an award.  Read more.

Egypt's Nubians call for their right to return home

As the call to prayer crackles through the village loudspeaker, 82-year-old Aicha hunches over a rickety coffee table in her conical hut. She grasps at a string of prayer beads and begins to mutter under her breath, asking to return to her homeland.
"I remember all the details of my childhood village," she says wistfully. "Fresh tilapia from the Nile, harvesting the date palms, the wheel that brought water from the river to our house; when we moved away, we lost everything."  Read more.

Muslim leaders begin European tour to protest against violence

Dozens of religious leaders boarded a bus on the Champs Elysees in Paris on Saturday to kick off a European tour of the sites of recent Islamist attacks to remember the victims and condemn violence.    Imams from countries including France, Belgium, Britain and Tunisia were joined by representatives of other religious communities at the spot where French policeman Xavier Jugele was shot dead in April.  Read more.

Protests continue in Hamburg as G20 Summit kicks off

Fires burned across downtown Hamburg for the second day of clashes between anti-capitalist protesters and police while leaders of the world's 20 most powerful countries listened to Beethoven's 9th Symphony and dined in style.
Police said at least 196 officers were injured in the clashes, with 83 protesters temporarily detained at the scene and 19 taken into custody.  Read more.

Departing Ethics Chief Strongly Suggest Trump's Private Interests Are Profiting From Presidency

Following his abrupt resignation on Thursday—which lawmakers and watchdog groups said should be "deeply unnerving" to advocates of government accountability—Office of Government Ethics (OGE) head Walter Shaub said in a televised interview on CBS that it appears Donald Trump and members of his family are profiting from his presidency.
I can't know what their intention is," Shaub said. "I know that the effect is that there's an appearance that the businesses are profiting from his occupying the presidency. And appearance matters as much as reality."  Read more.

What Does War Generate? Profits for a Few, Death for Many

At an April, 2017 Symposium on Peace in Nashville, TN, Martha Hennessy spoke about central tenets of Maryhouse, a home of hospitality in New York City, where Martha often lives and works. Every day, the community there tries to abide by the counsels of Dorothy Day, Martha's grandmother, who co-founded houses of hospitality and a vibrant movement in the 1930s. During her talk, she held up a postcard-sized copy of one of the movement's defining images, Rita Corbin's celebrated woodcut listing "The Works of Mercy" and "The Works of War."  Read more.